Sept. 23, 2021

Move Past the Comparison Factor and Pursue Your Vivid Vision with Alison Nissen and Marcy Stoudt

Move Past the Comparison Factor and Pursue Your Vivid Vision with Alison Nissen and Marcy Stoudt

Have you ever wondered how you could make things in life and business go much more smoothly and easily? Alison Nissen and Marcy Stoudt discovered that by joining forces in building their coaching business, Revel Coach, and in supporting each other in their individual efforts as well, they were making faster progress and having way more fun.  

In this three-way conversation, you’re going to hear how the fact that Alison and Marcy are sisters has been the launching point for the supportive and fun atmosphere they promote inside Revel Coach.  “Maybe I could” is the driving principle behind their company because they know that with the support of like-minded women, anything is possible.  ​​Revel Coach mentors women as they build a framework for their next steps in their career, volunteerism, or public service.

Alison and Marcy grew up in Shillington, Pennsylvania in a home nicknamed Camp Brown. They both graduated from Denison University.  

​Between the two of them, they’ve lived in 14 cities, 10 states, and 4 countries. They have 7 kids ranging in age from 28 and 12 and have experienced, first hand, the generosity of friends and family while experiencing complications of motherhood, military deployments, and devastating diseases of Alzheimer's, Lou Gehrig's, and cancer.

​They've answered the question "what do you do" with titles ranging from receptionist to vice-president, author, troop leader, and professor. But by far, their favorite shared title is Mom, regardless of location and working status.  They know “It’s better together.”

Timestamps: 

  • [2:44] How Alison and Marcy got started working together
  • [5:05] The major personal life event that led to their collaboration in business
  • [6:23] What Alison and Marcy realized after they started
  • [9:57] The meaning behind the name “Revel Coach”
  • [10:54] The mindset of “failing big”
  • [14:46] The dangers of comparing yourself to others
  • [18:32] How to prevent your business from sapping your joy 

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For more information on the Make Time for Success podcast, visit:

https://www.maketimeforsuccesspodcast.com

Connect with Us!

Dr. Christine Li -

Website: https://www.procrastinationcoach.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/procrastinationcoach

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/procrastinationcoach/

Alison Nissen and Marcy Stoudt -

Website: https://www.revelcoach.com

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/revelcoach

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/RevelCoach

 

Transcript

Christine Li:

Welcome back to The make time for success podcast. This is episode number 41. Have you ever been held back by your beliefs that you're just not ready, or you're not going to be as good as you need to be, whether it be at home or in your work life? Well, today's guests, Allison Nissen, and Marcy stout have used their bonds as sisters, literal sisters, to leapfrog over their limiting beliefs to establish their coaching business that helps women to grow their businesses. While having fun and staying true to their vision. Their company revel coach, mentors, women as they build a framework for next steps in their career, volunteerism or public service. This interview was the first time I had ever spoken to either Alison or Marcy, and I was immediately struck by how beautiful their relationship is, as sisters, friends, and work partners. And I think you're going to enjoy their energy, their stories and their tips for not wasting any more time in pursuing those amazing dreams that you have for yourself. Let's go listen to the episode now. Hi, I'm Dr. Christine Li, and I'm a psychologist and a procrastination coach. I've helped 1000s of people move past procrastination and overwhelm so they can begin working to their potential. In this podcast if you're going to learn powerful strategies for getting your mind, body, and energy to work together, so that you can focus on what's really important, and accomplish the goals you want to achieve. When you start living within your full power, you're going to see how being productive can be easy, and how you can create success on demand. Welcome to the make time for success podcast. Hi, everyone. Today I have the pleasure of hosting a conversation with two new friends of mine. And I'm excited to become new colleagues of theirs too. And to showcase their wonderful work with you today. I want to introduce you to Marcy stout, and Alison Nissen, who are two sisters who are going to continue on with the introduction right now so that you get to know what makes them tick and what they're doing professionally. Marcy, do you want to start us off?

Marcy Stoudt:

Great. Well, thank you so much for being on this show. We love the conversation around procrastination. And we have so many things within our story that we definitely can relate to being entrepreneurs and having some fear of getting started. But our story is my sister and I, you know, as close as we were growing up, we just had different paths. After going to college, we did go to the same college, we were five years apart, so not at the same time. But we just had, you know, different degrees different paths after school, when we have started our careers where I went the corporate route, and went pretty fast into corporate america and Allison went the route that included everything from teaching to being a professor to she was a military wife and started children early. But together, you know, we always work together like having like fun little exercises of like holding each other accountable, or just things that sisters do. And we finally got to this place where I had left corporate America, and I'm staying home after 20 years of being executive there. I was staying home with the kids and I just had this itch to start a business. And I knew I wanted to serve this community, really who I was 10 years or 15 years earlier of the executive woman who's trying to navigate their career and family but didn't want to sacrifice quality time. They don't want to sacrifice health that I really want to start my executive coaching practice doing that. And I no idea where to get started. So of course my first place is kind of lean on my sister. And she and I were brainstorming as she had already had a business started as an entrepreneur. And I'll let her introduce kind of her story where our two paths met as entrepreneurs.

Christine Li:

Wonderful. Thank you, Alison, take it away.

Alison Nissen:

Well, Christine, thank you so much for having us on. Our stories are a little bit the same in a lot of ways. As we grew up. Marcy is a little bit younger than I am. So all of a sudden she would do things that I had already done. We had similar weddings, we obviously went to the same college, we had a lot of things that were very similar in the same path. But I did go academic. So I became a professor. And I had been passed over for promotion because I didn't write a book. And my competition did. When I had the opportunity to slow down. I thought this is my time I'm going to write and somebody had contacted me to actually write their story. And it prompted me to become a ghostwriter. I started a business ghost writing. Well, I would like to call it ghost editing. So people would hand me a man scrimp and save, fix it for me. And I would inside be that voice in the background fixing it. So I had been working with clients privately. And it was a lot of fun. And it was very rewarding. But I never quite understood business because, you know, I have a graduate degree in English literature, not exactly how to do profit and loss statement. I didn't have a marketing background I there are all these things I didn't have. And so I would call Marcy, and ask, What do I do now? I don't understand. In the meanwhile, she started calling me What do I do now I don't understand, eventually, part of our story is that our mom developed all timers. And when we would call our mom, those phone calls started to slow down, and we started calling each other more. And eventually, we just decided, you know what, it's better together. And we decided to start revenue coach, as sisters, to hold ourselves accountable. Because there's never a right time. And there's never a wrong time. And being solopreneurs is a really difficult thing to do. And so when we could do it together, we could really support each other and set milestones and goals that we could achieve. Eventually, we started Tuesday at Two. Marcy, do you want to talk about Tuesday at Two?

Marcy Stoudt:

Sure. We were in the beginning stages of brainstorming, I was trying to take off my corporate america hat, which was all about business plans and strategies and things like that. So we would flesh out one idea and take it there for about, I don't know, a month, six weeks, a lot of work trying to figure it out. And then finally, Allison was like, why don't we just get started? And I'm like, really, like, just start. So we decided that we were going to start this platform where we wanted to celebrate another woman in business. Actually, it didn't start with that it started with, we wanted to call another woman in business and ask her for advice. And we started doing that. And we recognized Wait, why are we doing this alone when other women and other people in our situation would love to learn the same thing from this other woman in business? So that's where I kind of started. And the first time we said, let's just start, we're like, let's pick a time. So Tuesday at Two rhymed. We're both for East Coast at the time. And then we just started and we just would ask one of our friends that we admired, and we would interview her and ask for questions. And one thing led to another, we were on this Fast Pass of like an MBA track of how to start as an entrepreneur. And with each interview, we were taking crazy fast action on our business plans. And just doing it in a way that was so joyful and fun. Because Alice and I were not hosting a podcast as the expert, were hosting the podcast as we got a lot of questions. And we just want to have some fun while we're doing this. And one thing led to another, our consistency allowed us to launch a brand, which allowed us to launch a lot of some other businesses and some clients that we serve.

Christine Li:

I love both of your origin stories and the fact that they're so linked. And I thought immediately, Marcy, when you said, you know, as sisters do, and I'm thinking, I don't know, if I know a lot of sisters who have an accountability relationship with each other, I think what you have is very special, and that you could rely on each other in such useful and important ways and build a business together, while having fun that that's quite an accomplishment. So I just wanted to share my feedback that I think you, you ladies are very special. So I also love what you said about taking fast action. Because building anything, whether it's a business, a family, a side interest, there's going to be so many different factors that cause you to feel like you have to take it very slowly. So I just wanted to highlight what you're saying. And I hope that our listeners are really taking this in that. You could wait, you could hem and haw, you can ask more advisors. And you could just start, you could put it into play, so that you have a better sense of what you're actually dealing with. And I want to share my story of running this podcast. I didn't start with a really firm plan worked out plan of how I wanted to run and I like the two of you also really enjoyed listening to my guest experts and finding I was learning so much. I was able to grow the podcast, contribute to my guests growth as well and have a lot of fun with it. So I am onboard with your rebel way. Could you do me a favor and let me know why the word revel r e v e l because I don't think I understand that yet.

Marcy Stoudt:

Well, I love the word rebel because it doesn't Finish in is basically living life in a lively way. And then it has a comma, especially with music and dancing and drinking. So right when you talk about Ravel, it's like just reveling in the moment just having fun and enjoying the moment. And I think when we were kind of thinking about different ideas of our coaching, neither of us believe in the concept of being so serious that where you take yourself so serious is a recipe for success. So we wanted something in the coaching space that wasn't in a way of, you need my help, because you're in a bad position. And we're in a good position, and we'll teach you what we know, we wanted it to be like, we're all growing in life together. And again, credit to our mom, you know, we grew up in a home that we nicknamed camp Brown, and they were constantly having parties, we set goals, we had fun, but life was supposed to be joyful. And a lot of our branding is around this word, rebel. Because revel is meant to be like, let's enjoy life, let's enjoy the day to day. And we will say as entrepreneurs, it is very stressful. Like, I'm not going to overlook the fact that there's a lot of times where I'm up way too early in the morning with an idea or how to connect with a client that hasn't said yes, yet. So we certainly have stress. But in our revenue, a process a lot of the theme around it is enjoying the moments like enjoying the growth and having the mindset that we want to fail big, you know, we want to put ourselves out there. And if we do, fail it, nobody judges you for failing, the real judgment comes in and how you stand up afterwards? Did you learn from it? Are you stronger from that, and that really, especially in the spaces of service that all three of us are in, people are looking for humility, they're not looking for perfection. So that's one of the reasons why we love the word rebel and infeld is so reflective of both of our personalities, and what we want to do for our vision of the company.

Christine Li:

I love it, especially the music and the dancing. I'm not a drinker. But I love the thought enjoyment. And I'm happy for the people who also enjoy drinking. I want to ask about that whole perfection standard. Because I'm thinking as you're talking that maybe there's a reason why everybody's feeling so stressed. And like their work doesn't cut the mustard all the time, that there's so much anxiety about level of performance and adequacy of performance. And what is your sense of how we got there and how women are affected by that standard. If I'm even right in calling that the standard?

Marcy Stoudt:

Well, I will like to say the one quote that we really love, like pondering, but comparison is the thief of joy. So when you are in a place of comparing yourself to others, if you're not doing in an admiration way, and you're doing it from a comparison, as if they have more than you there's a negative response to that, emotionally, physically and everything. And as easy as it is now to start your business based on your passion in a way that you can have control of your livelihood, and your schedule and everything. There's so many wonderful things about entrepreneurialship that is in our favor. But the one thing that definitely happens is to get clients out there they want to trust, they have an expectation to know you. And that is through often social media and videos and podcasts and getting yourself out there. And I don't know many people other than insert my sister that don't have fear of public speaking and sharing your story and things like that. So one of the reasons why I went from total fear of starting a business because you know, I need to replace my corporate income. And to do that you kind of like well, you know, it's just it's difficult when you go from corporate America, then entrepreneur because there's that climb you did in your 20s. And now you're almost 50 or like, Am I starting over? Like it's confusing? So I had a lot of fear and a lot of fear of like, Who am I to say this story? And how do I share my story? So my first mentorship and this is why Allison's a better person to answer this question that you asked. But I had a lot of fear in what you're saying, because I would quickly compare myself to people that have none of my business of comparing myself to. And then I couldn't figure out how to shape my story of significance. I didn't know where to get started and talking. I was really afraid when Allison said, let's just get started. Let's have our first Tuesday at Two. And luckily she has practice and a business around storytelling and public presence and speaking things like that. So that helped me a lot. But to get back to your original question. So Allison, can you just share like your thoughts and the plight maybe with women or maybe with all entrepreneurs, with all entrepreneurs, I

Alison Nissen:

will tell you that. First of all, it's

Marcy Stoudt:

scary.

Alison Nissen:

We are probably our harshest critics, but it's depending on who we're looking to for advice. So for looking to somebody who doesn't believe we can do it. That's already And negative, because they're telling us a story. And we want to trust them. And if their story is negative, that's what we're going to take in. So it's all about the stories we tell ourselves. When we tell ourselves, this is a good story. This is where I can begin, this is who I am, I'm showing up perfectly imperfect. And I am going to just jump in, because that's how you figure it out. Now, I am a firm believer in figuring it out. But as women, we do a lot of comparisons, and we hold ourselves up to the person who lives next door. But we don't know what their story is, we don't know the shoes that they're walking in. We don't know what their problems are, we don't know what their successes are. And if we're only looking at social media, we're really clueless. So we need to make sure that we are taking a full inventory of who we are, and finding the proud moments within us. And a quick little story. I wanted to be an Olympian when I was growing up, what I really wanted to do, but let me tell you, I was the slowest swimmer on the team. I kid you not, my dad looked at me. And so that's great, you can still go to the Olympics, they need coaches. Right, it was a lesson and reframing my expectations. So my expectations adjusted. I didn't ever become a swim coach. But I realized that I was able to shape my story. And what I really wanted. So if I really wanted to go to the Olympics, there's more than one way I could have been a journalist, I could have still gone to the Olympics, as a journalist, I could have been a coach, I could have been a sponsor, there's so many different ways you can do things, you don't have to do it the way everybody else is doing it. That's the best part about being an entrepreneur.

Christine Li:

I love the Olympic example. Because I think for me, that's just a reflection of your joy and your love of what you were doing and your belief in yourself. And I love that your business, your shared business is built from the principle of inspiring people to work and live from that place of high joy, where you don't have to shrink yourself, or you don't have to hold back where you don't have to be quiet. And you might even enjoy stretching yourself beyond where you think you might get to. I think it's a surprises of entrepreneurship, from from my own experience to that are the best. You don't even know who you're going to meet. You don't know who you're going to touch and rescue oftentimes. So thank you for sharing these stories and these perspectives. I know we talked before we pressed record about the concept of how to get started. When you've got ideas, you've got motivation, you've got maybe the moment, but you're just feeling frozen. You're feeling a what if this really doesn't take? What if I don't really want to use my time that way? I think it's not just a fear of failure. It's sometimes it's fear of what if this takes over in a way that I can't control anymore? How would you ladies help that person who's in that spot?

Alison Nissen:

Well, that's one of the reasons why we've developed the rebel way is it helps the whole person take stock of who they are at all points of their lives. So when we think about creating a vivid vision, it's not about the business. It's about who we are as a person. I am a strong, successful mother. I am a writer, I am a it's those positive statements that we take in. It's not I am the next, Elon Musk, I don't want to be Ilan Musk, I want to be the best Allison I could be so it's crafting a vision around who I am. And then from there, it's aligning our action with that vision. So if my vision is that I want to be as healthy apparent as I can be. My goal is not going to be just to run a marathon. But my goal is going to be able to take the ability to maintain a healthy lifestyle. There's a difference between a healthy lifestyle, which is a journey goal, versus a finite goal, which is running a marathon. You get the medal, you put it on your neck for about 10 seconds and then you hang it on a wall and ends up in a closet. You never think about it again. So it's taking that vision, aligning your action. And then from there, we think about a growth mindset. And all of these factions work together at different times. So it's not like there's stackable, but they're interchangeable. So realizing that you're growing along the way. So if my goal is to become healthy, and I start to feel success in that, now I've grown a little bit, what else can I do to increase that a little bit more. And then finally, it's that prioritizing joy. If we don't find joy in what we're doing, that's when it's time to reevaluate. So if our business our entrepreneurial journey is taking over, it's too much time. We can see it's damaging our family, it's damaging our relationships. It's not what we want, as who we envisioned in the beginning. That's when we need to step back and say, Okay, I need to readjust. And there's nothing wrong with readjusting one of the best parts about being an entrepreneur is that we can speed up and slow down when we need to.

Marcy Stoudt:

So I remember when we were building our business a we both decided no, before we had these pillars, these four pillars that Alison shared, we were like, We decided to be Do It Yourself entrepreneurs because I came from an outsourcing industry. So I really believe in outsourcing. But I also don't believe in outsourcing if I don't really even understand what I need, That, to me felt like a waste of money. And then Alison loves, like, trying to figure this stuff out. So we, we decided we were going to build our own website and start everything from scratch. And I found myself working like around the clock, and I have three kids at home husband, I went from stay home mom to now working around the clock, no income, you know, it's all starting. Now it's getting very stressed about it. And the first time that we recognize prioritizing joy needs to be a theme of everything we do was when I was stressed, I call Allison. I'm like, Ah, you know, humming and haulin and she just says, well, Marcia, what? What makes you happy? What? What do you get joyful about? And so she's asking like, a sister, like a friend, like genuinely, why are we doing this? And I was like, Well, really like my kids. You know, like, I genuinely love like, they can be silly. There's so much fun to be around. And she's like, Okay, well, how can we do rebel like with the kids? And next, you know, it sounds so simple. But the shift was, wait, how can I be an entrepreneur and my family seeing me work as hard as I was knowing the vision of where we're headed, like I was clear and where we were headed. But I wasn't there yet. And then we saw me there yet. So that gap felt stressful. It's like, Wait, how can I get them? And then can they learn from like my work ethic to get there. So when we look back, you'd like remember when you're in elementary school, and mom was working like crazy. So that was one step. And the other steps, I actually just started engaging them. And I would kind of show them the colors of our website, and I would start asking them and my daughter, who was the oldest all of her friends would come over dripping out of the pool, you know, they were living the life of leisure. But they would come in and I'd say, you know, what do you think about this? Or do you like this picture. So a lot of them were like helping me build the business. And then every time we landed our first client, or even just a great interviewer for our Tuesday to which is, you know, free service, they would celebrate with me, I'm like, guessing we got and I'd show the website of our new speaker or one of my new clients. And I took the solopreneur journey out because I had my sister as a partner, I had inspiration around me, but she really she just asked me like what brings you joy, and once that kind of got recalibrated. It just held me accountable to you know, doing what it takes to get started and then applying the joy principle, whenever I could to make sure that what I was doing felt worthy of my time.

Christine Li:

Thank you beautiful principals. Thank you both for articulating this method. And I think you're right, that it's not what you do one, and then you do the next one that we need to find joy everywhere we can, especially these days in these stressful times. And in business, or if you're listening and you're not an entrepreneur, whatever you're trying to create for yourself, make sure there's room for you make sure there's room for your heart. I'm so impressed by the love that you guys have for each other and for the work. And for just this creation process that you can do this with your families. You can do this. In the middle of the night. It's okay, it's okay as long as we're having fun, which I really appreciate. And my standpoint for as the procrastination coach is that stress really can get the best of us even when we have this genius idea or so much to give that we can be the bottleneck we could be the crushing factor, that comparison factor even and the three of us just want to encourage you all who are listening to ease up on that is up on that pedal and just find what makes sense for you. What can you do next? What feels right for you, without so much fearing what's going to happen next or what the outcome is going to be, or how it's going to feel because you're going to grow into that, too. And you have wonderful ladies like Marcy and Alison here ready to help you if you decide to work with them. And I hope that you guys consider that to, please let us know, what your community looks like, and what lessons you've learned from hosting the community and nurturing the community.

Marcy Stoudt:

Well start with sharing our Tuesday at Two community is it's designed to create this community of like minded women, who starts with this principle of maybe I could, so if anything, our demographic tends to be like my sister, I made the 50 year old woman trying to reinvent herself. So we used to say, you know, in your 20s, you get hired for your potential. In your 30s you get hired for your experience in your 40s is for your wisdoms, and then your 50s, you get to do what I want to do for the rest of my life. Simply nurture that community. And what we found to be really successful with our group is, we find women that believe in mentorship, and they believe in sharing their advice, because individually, we do know things, but collectively, we know a lot. So leveraging that together. So we really look for women that believe in, you know, sharing their service and sharing their inspiration and sharing like tips and tricks and wanting to connect with other women like that. So that's one of our biggest communities together. And then each of us, Allison has her practice with amplifying her public presence, the branded interviews, and I have mine with the executive mom. So we both have two separate communities that we're both members of each other. So we still say together, we still stay together. But we also have other communities that we've built, which is just fun, because that solopreneur part of the business can actually be pretty draining. So for for us, we always say in our coaching practices is that time is finite, there's only 24 hours. So that's, that's a number that takes away every day, you can't control time. But what you can control is your energy. So we try to focus on energy management versus time management. So if you're procrastinating something, it's probably draining your energy, which is making you theologic and procrastinate a lot of other things. So if you find those things, again, in our language, it's finding the joy. But if you find the things like you, you really understand your vision of where you're headed. And you get super clear on it. That's it's compelling to you to create action, and then your actions are aligned to it. So you're pretty quick to say no, if it doesn't align, and you're saying hell yes to the things that do align, it's harder to procrastinate, because you're doing activities that fill you up. So Allison, I preparing for this interview, we were saying, for example, it's just fun to be on podcast, even though you know, every party, I still get nervous. Maybe Allison doesn't but you know, you get nervous getting a podcast like this. But it's so fun for the two of us to spend time together and meet other women. I think about your audience. I did listen to some of your podcast, I read some of your work. And I feel like you probably have this amazing community that's leaning on this wanting to do some great things. So doing things like podcast together is an energy filler upper Is that the right word for me, but finding things that you like to do and that helps navigate you know, as an entrepreneur, it's hard to know that fine line, is this marketing, or is this me giving free services. And that sometimes can stress some entrepreneurs out so we just kind of keep it simple. If we're enjoying the process and having fun with it where Yes, and that to us makes it pretty easy to know if it works for us.

Christine Li:

Okay, beautiful. Thank you. Elsa, do you have something to add about the community that you have fostered?

Alison Nissen:

The community is so delightful to work with. Because we have had such a variety of people that we've gotten to know over the years. One of the things is, is that we're all so different. Even though many of us have similar stories. We might be midlife woman becoming an empty nester, we are an empty nester. We're ready to change you're ready to take on the world. We're excited about life. And that is one of the things that our community we share is that excitement. And some people if they're really negative, or they're really having a hard time, you know, it's when they need to stop and slow down and really start to find the small joys in their wives because when you can identify the small ones That's what you see. And we've created this community of women where we're able to celebrate each other. And a lot of times as women, we don't get celebrated. Enough, right? We're making dinner. My biggest stress point growing up was like not growing up. But as an as a parent was dinner, like, tell me what you want to eat, and I'll make it. Don't make me make the menu. Like that was like the biggest stress of my life, it was so stressful that my kids would be like, are we gonna have dinner tonight? And I'd be like, Oh, my gosh, I haven't thought about dinner. Because I want them to reject me and what I was fixing them, you know, it was, it's like became a cycle. But once I learned, like, let them play on the menu, I'll cook it has no problem doing the grocery shopping. That was great. But that was a celebration. Once we learn to celebrate each other, and we created that community of celebration, it was that finding those little tiny pieces of joy and being able to celebrate each other, raise each other up. That is what creates a winning community. And that's what we've been able to foster.

Christine Li:

Beautiful, I love it. Love it. Thank you for sharing the dinnertime stories too. I have one last interview question for both of you. I would like just to play with this, each of you to respond with what comes up for you. What would you tell the self that was pre this business, this rebel coach business? What would you tell that self now Now that you have the power of hindsight,

Alison Nissen:

I would say, Allison, this is going to be really, really fun. I was very hesitant. My sister was very successful. I looked up to her even though she's my younger, taller sister. So she's my bigger sister in some ways, but I looked up to her. And I thought, there's no way I can be that successful. And then I thought I would be holding her back. And what I discovered was that this was going to be so much fun. It was going to be more I've used the word Joy 1000 times a day, more joyful than I could have ever envisioned. And that's exactly what it has been. And so I'm just like, every day I wake up thankful that I've been able to grow up with this person. And that she's been able to celebrate me I've been able to celebrate her. We've gone to each other's obviously kids wedding, you know, my step daughter got married, her daughter graduated. It's just so much fun. So sharing all those joys along the way has been so overly rewarding that there's not a day I would trade.

Christine Li:

Love it. Love it. Thank you. Marcy, how about you?

Marcy Stoudt:

All right. Can I say ditto? Yeah, I feel like I leaned on Allison and looked up to her. So for me, it's the exact same thing. So I'm always honored when she says that because I feel the exact same thing. But my thing that I would say like looking back when I was on that platform of Should I do something? Should I not do something? Can I charge for this, you know, like those types of things. I think my simple thing is just dream big, you're going to do something really fun. And that to me is like just stay focused on dreaming bigger. Because to us, what we find interesting is, again, in the procrastination world, it is limiting thoughts, that is your choice on how you view your your perspective, and choose big, like, choose to go for it. So every time you get one goal, there's another viewpoint of where you can go. So just trusting that process and knowing that every time you're a new platform, you're gonna have a lot of like, you know, growth opportunities. And that's fine, as long as you recognize like this is a part of the process. And there's more to accomplish. And, you know, we've been doing this now three and a half years, so I still feel like a newbie. And so far, it's been pretty awesome. So far. We're not there yet.

Christine Li:

I love it. Thank you, ladies for sharing yourselves with me and my listeners and this show. And I can't wait to see where your business blossoms. I agree with you, Marcy, that when you just go to the next level, so many other things just appear that you can do. But that doesn't mean our stress level needs to rise. It just means that we can take advantage of more and we can do more and we can grow more. So let's do this together. Thank you ladies for joining me. Please share with us how our listeners can connect with you and work with you.

Marcy Stoudt:

The best place is rebel coach calm and then rebel coach is also our Instagram, LinkedIn, and Facebook. So that's probably the best but we try to make our contact information pretty easily found on all of our social media.

Christine Li:

Okay, beautiful. Thank you so much and it's rebel, R e V l so remember to celebrate all that you do and have joy as you do it. Thank you ladies again for joining me today. It was a pleasure.

Alison Nissen:

Thank you, Christine.

Marcy Stoudt:

Yeah, thank you so much. It was so wonderful,

Christine Li:

and give. Thank you for listening to this episode of The make time for success podcast. If you enjoyed what you've heard, you can subscribe to make sure you get notified of upcoming episodes. You can also visit our website make time for success podcast.com for past episodes, show notes and all the resources we mentioned on the show. Feel free to connect with me over on Instagram too. You can find me there under the name procrastination coach. Send me a DM and let me know what your thoughts are about the episodes you've been listening to. And let me know any topics that you might like me to talk about on the show. I'd love to hear all about how you're making time for success. Talk to you soon.

Alison Nissen and Marcy Stoudt

Founders of Revel Coach

Sisters, Alison and Marcy grew up in Shillington, Pennsylvania in a home nicknamed Camp Brown. They both graduated from Denison University.

​Between the two of them, they’ve lived in 14 cities, 10 states, and 4 countries. They have 7 kids ranging in age from 28 and 12 and have experienced, first hand, the generosity of friends and family while experiencing complications of motherhood, military deployments, and devastating diseases of Alzheimer's, Lou Gehrig's, and cancer.

​They've answered the question "what do you do" with titles ranging from receptionist to vice-president, author, troop leader, and professor. But by far, their favorite shared title is Mom, regardless of location and working status.

Their coaching business and platform, Revel Coach, is designed to create a community of women who want to inspire and be inspired. “Maybe I could” is the driving principle behind their company because they know that with the support of like-minded women, anything is possible.

​​Revel Coach mentors women as they build a framework for Next Steps in their career, volunteerism, or public service.