March 25, 2021

The Secret to Getting the Best Expression of Yourself with Carrie Hamm

The Secret to Getting the Best Expression of Yourself with Carrie Hamm

Figuring out who you really are and being able to be and act as the truest version of yourself can be so powerful in any and all areas of your life. When Carrie Hamm figured out living and breathing the corporate scene for over 20 years wasn’t for her anymore, she considered what she wanted to do next. As she had worked in a heavily male-dominated industry, it wasn’t until she discovered a women-only co-working space that she began to thrive. She started to notice the stark differences between working with the women she met in the co-working space, and this made her realize how different genders are raised in today’s society.

While spending more and more time working with women, she realized how much society influenced the thoughts and limits placed in the minds of girls and women. Many times we don’t express our true selves due to the influence of friend groups, family, and peers. However, when we learn how to manage how, when, and where we decide to invest our energy, that’s when our true selves begin to thrive. 

In this week’s episode, I’m introducing you to Carrie Hamm, a business strategist and intuitive coach who helps entrepreneurs with a big vision to amplify their energy for massive impact and abundance. She draws on a 20+ year career in back-office software development combined with 20+ years as a Tibetan Buddhist meditator to dial in the business processes and expansive mindset needed for taking giant steps in scaling a business.

Timestamps: 

[2:12] The journey from corporate America to entrepreneur 

[10:28] How we are conditioned growing up plays a factor in how we decide to take action and tackle our goals. 

[17:23] Energy from past experiences might be holding you back, but you can still grow and transform into a new energy that will help you be the full expression of yourself. 

[29:02] The smallest thing from your past could be what’s holding you back. Think about what factors are making you feel like you can’t use your full inner fire.

 

For more information on the Make Time for Success podcast, visit:

https://www.maketimeforsuccesspodcast.com

 

Connect with Us!

Dr. Christine Li [host] -

Website: https://www.procrastinationcoach.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/procrastinationcoach

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/procrastinationcoach/


Carrie Hamm  [guest] -

Website: https://www.carriehamm.com/

Website for podcast listeners: https://www.carriehamm.com/podguest 

Clubhouse: @carriehamm

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/carrielahamm

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thealchemychannel

Transcript

Christine Li:

Welcome back to the show. This is Episode 15. Have you ever thought or felt that you've been using your energy incorrectly, almost like you've been fighting against yourself? Well, my guest today, Kerry ham, who is a business strategist, and intuitive coach is going to teach us all about the importance of having our energy flowing well, so that we can have a much greater impact from our actions and in our work without expending all of our precious energy. She is a fantastic teacher of energy, and of alignment, and she's a wonderful woman, I think you're gonna love this episode. Let's go listen. Hi, I'm Dr. Christine Li, and I'm a psychologist and a procrastination coach. I've helped 1000s of people move past procrastination and overwhelm, so they could begin working to their potential. In this podcast, if you're going to learn powerful strategies for getting your mind, body, and energy to work together, so that you can focus on what's really important, and accomplish the goals you want to achieve. When you start living within your full power, you're going to see how being productive can be easy, and how you can create success on demand. Welcome to the make time for success podcast. Hi, everyone, today I am welcoming carry ham to the show. She is a lovely person, a good friend of mine, we've met just towards the end of 2018. And we've stayed in touch around our shared interests of working in the coaching area. And I thought she should bring her wisdom and advice and her lovely personality to the show. So welcome to the show, Carrie.

Carrie Hamm:

Thank you and lovely intro.

Christine Li:

So Carrie, you are a business strategist and an intuitive coach, could you please explain to us how you got to be in this position and what your work consists of?

Carrie Hamm:

Yeah, absolutely. So I actually have a 20 year history working within the corporate world, both with small businesses and large companies, such as Microsoft, and I was a software developer working in back office software. So this means that like, for almost my entire career, I was going into companies finding some section of their business that wasn't working, taking it apart, talking to people about how it should be put back together, reworking the processes in building, usually a piece of technology on top of that. So when I decided that I wasn't going to stay at Microsoft, I didn't really want to stay in a corporate world and like my heart was not in that anymore. It took me a while to figure out like what I wanted to do next, it was really a lot like kind of peeling an onion. And one of the things that I really realized was that a lot of the decisions I had made about how to move my career forward and what I wanted to do, but they were really fear based decisions around like, Am I gonna have enough money, you know, being a single mother, am I gonna be able to take care of my kids, I'm gonna have to move like all of these things that we're all just not decisions that were really based on, like, heart based decisions. And you know, what, what am I passionate about. And it took me a while to sort of strip this away. And I ended up starting a startup. So basically an application for people with food allergies, and dietary restrictions. And so while I was working on this, I was in kind of a soup with a lot of entrepreneurs and a lot of people who were building startups, and I was in a women's co working space. This was like the most amazing experience like being in this co working space with just other women after being in a completely male dominated industry for my entire career. And really, like getting fresh eyes on what it was like to work with women who had tremendous ambition, who are really trying to do something big. Just really got into helping them try to scale their businesses or even just kind of get off on the right foot. And it was just this completely like new world for me and a new passion for me to help people kind of on that journey and, and to figure out how they were going to set themselves up for the kind of impact that they wanted to have in the world.

Christine Li:

So was this accidental that you became their coach?

Carrie Hamm:

So we started out at a place called the Riveter, which was this fantastic women's co working space and we had an accountability group and it just so happened like, we would have, you know, kind of we'd all sit around and we talked about what we're working on and figure out how we could help each other and as time went on, It was funny because at the end of these meetings, I would have a queue of people that were waiting to ask me questions. One of the things that you learn when you're working on a startup, and I definitely learned this, when I got into working with angel investors, is you have to have another stream of income, something that's going to keep the money coming in, so that all of the stress and strain is not on your startup. And so I was doing consulting and the issue with consulting is you're really like, knee deep in somebody else's business, your hands are all the way in it in your mind is totally in it. So it's very difficult to have this big vision for a new business and try to build something totally new when you totally have all of your detailed mind in somebody else's business. And so I was like, What am I going to do, that's going to kind of pull me out of that. And as I was going to these meetings, and I had this queue of women waiting to talk to me, I was like, Oh, these kinds of people don't need consulting, these people just need someone to tell them how to do it themselves. So that's kind of how I got started on the coaching track. But the intuitive aspect of coaching came in, in this last year. Now, I didn't just become intuitive. In the past year or so, this is something that I have known was a superpower of mine, since I was really, really young. And I've always used it throughout my career, that's part of what helps me become successful everything from being able to know exactly where the problem was in the network, when something was wrong, to being able to advise an executive leader on exactly what was going on in the business behind the scenes and how things were kind of about to shift and what was coming. So I've always drawn on those skills. But it really started coming in to the next level when I joined a mastermind to really work on those intuitive skills, and with other people who knew how to amplify those. And so that part of my business really just took off. So first, here I am helping people figure out how to scale their technology, and what are we going to do with our business processes? And how do you set yourself up so that you can handle your CRM and all the customers that you're handling? To Hey, you know, it was really, really obvious from the get go that the most important thing that any business leader needed to scale was the mindset for scale, that without that, it didn't matter how many processes you hadn't heard how much technology you threw at it, or what you decided you were going to do that you had to sort of build the energy of this business behind the scenes and scale yourself first. And so helping people sort of grok what that means internally, and how to sort of hold the big vision, so that everything else can be nailed down around, it was really the most impactful work once we really got into it. And so that's kind of where it's going now is realizing that, that once people have that in place, and they really know what it is that they want to do, what it is that the business is about, and how they might need to shift their energy to expand in that direction. Everything else is easy. All the technology is easy. You know, it's not nearly as complicated as we make it out to be because that's really the most important piece.

Christine Li:

Okay, so now I am wondering about your own confidence level in making the shift from a lot of brain based work to a lot of intuitive work. And I guess one thing I'm wondering was, do you feel like you were suppressing some of the intuitive side of you for a while?

Carrie Hamm:

Yeah, yeah, no, absolutely, it definitely feels like that. This is a common thing, like having been sort of immersed in the world of the last maybe eight months or so with people who are strictly like intuitive spiritual coaches. This is a thing that people really struggle with, not just from the brain aspect, but also from the what is the world going to think when I tell them that I'm doing this kind of like, you know, whoo, and weird, and, you know, not really easy to comprehend thing. From the brain based work perspective, it was really like, for me, there is a lot of conflict at first, especially if you're a very logical sort of thinkery person. And you also have very strong intuition. You're aware of the intuition. And then the logic steps in and says, Oh, well, no, the logical answer is this and you're like, but then I feel like this is like, no, the logical answer is this, kind of do this dance. And so eventually, as an intuitive person, you have to be able to say, I know what the logic says, I'm gonna set that aside, I'm gonna go with the intuitive thing first, and then you know, we'll deal with whatever shakes out in the end. And I found that well, over 90% of the time, the intuition was spot on, or something about it was spot on. And who knows why that is. I think, even just when we look at the work of Malcolm Gladwell, I love the book blink, where he talks about like how much we we really know with our subconscious, whether that's something way out there in the ether that's giving you information or you're retrieving it or if it's just you're very, very in tune With your subconscious doesn't really matter, like the results are there, you usually tend to go with the results.

Christine Li:

Okay. All right. So then I'm thinking about the difference between working with men and working with women. And if you could describe a little bit more about the different impacts on you and your own systems of trying to make sense of things.

Carrie Hamm:

Yeah. So funny, I've been talking about this so much lately. One of the really interesting things about the journey of being a woman who gravitates towards working with men, if we think about the way girls come up in the world, and the way boys come up in the world, and so I have one daughter, who is 22. And I have two boys that are 19, and 11, almost 12. So I spent a lot of time also around their friends, and kind of just really, like, I'm a super keen observer. And that's part of my strength as a coach is just sort of looking at the arc of what is humanity doing? And what is the pattern here? And what do I see again, and again. And it's fascinating to watch kids come into their adolescence and start to really split off gender wise in the way they approach the world, and usually reinforced by society around them, like they're reinforcing it, in the middle schools, in the high schools. And then they really diverged around this time. And so you see that boys often like to brag a lot, they'd like to have, you know, a good time and tease each other, they'll put each other down, and kind of like, there's a lot of hubris with boys, like, I'm gonna do this huge thing. I'm, you know, going to beat up the robbers, like, whatever it is, they don't discourage each other from trying really, really big things and saying, they're going to do big things. And conversely, when you watch girls who write about Middle School, you know, when everyone all of them are becoming much more self conscious, girls tend to all want to be the same. So there's this idea that, you know, we need to dress alike, we need to act like we need to wear hair the same way, we're all going to dress the same way to go to this ballgame, whatever it is. And there's not a lot of tolerance for being different. And there's not a lot of tolerance for someone who's sort of going to rise up in this kind of way, you have this prevalence of Mean Girls, because the only girls who are going to do that are ones who are going to be mean enough to sort of hold the top spot. And so you have this really different way of coming up in the world. And girls really want to orient off of a group at this age. And the idea is, we're all going to stick together, or there's going to be held to pay whether you're at the top of the bottom, it's not going to be good for you. And so I think when men and women move into the workplace with these ideas, you have very different outcomes, especially in a corporate environment. And you still see it some in entrepreneurship. But one of the things that you can consistently see women in entrepreneurship do is try to always keep whatever it is they're trying to do a little smaller than they really are a little, you know, like, I'm not gonna really say how big it is that I want to be, I'm not really going to talk about, like, you know, how, what my big vision is here, I'm just gonna say, I'm just doing this little thing here, I'm just doing this next little thing here, so that it's almost like they're afraid of that tall poppy syndrome, where Yeah, I don't know, this is a very common expression in, you know, like England or Australia, like, if the tall poppy is going to get chopped. And so they tend to kind of keep things small, whereas men, very often, I'm going to do this huge thing, it's going to be amazing, it's going to be the greatest, you know, and you'll see this too, and like, you know, when they're recapping for their reviews, you know, I did something absolutely amazing when, you know, it probably isn't, but it creates so much enthusiasm from other people. And it generates a lot of energy for them that's positive, that pushes them into the next phase that pushes them to the next thing. And so even if they haven't really achieved whatever it is they wanted to achieve, they've gotten pretty far, and they've garnered a lot of support. And women struggle more with this, because they will often and you know, and this is always a generalization, but they will often try to hang together in a group and not shine. And that is a problem when they are in a tradition that we really need to try to do something big. And I have a dear friend who was in my mastermind, and she was the one that really threw this into like, sharp relief for me, because she is amazing. She's one of these people every time she speaks, everybody's jaw just drops and they stop what they're doing. And they're like, What is she saying? And she really does shine. And I was asking her something about why she wasn't sharing in the group why she wasn't like there was something she wasn't doing. And I was like, why didn't you do that? And she was like, Well, I have to be careful. I have to be sure that I let everybody else talk that I'm not the first one to answer. I have to be sure that I don't pay too much attention to you or someone else. So nobody thinks I'm playing favorites and I have to do this and that and I'm like, Oh my gosh, you've just described like you're doing an excellent job of being a dutiful and Proper woman doing all the right things to get along with women I was like in, you're also doing exactly the things that will hold you back that will hold all of us back because you're not reaching your potential. And that pattern I'm seeing kind of everywhere now and starting to say, How can we pull ourselves out of this? How can we start to pull our groups out of this, and recognize that when we see one woman shining, that that is something that is now possible for us, because we're in close contact, because we're starting to see what she's doing, we have some new information. And we really need to encourage that rather than discouraging each other or starting to tear each other down or make comparisons.

Christine Li:

I love this, and I can hear your energy rise as you're even describing, trying to encourage other women, right, it is wonderful to lift each other up and to help each other through these difficult energy vibes. These group vibes, the pressure to feel like you need to stay safe and to conform, which really doesn't help. Anyone. I think I agree with you. Yeah. So could you tell us some of your tricks or strategies or tips for individuals, women, or men who might be struggling with having the right energy to succeed that they're holding themselves back somehow?

Carrie Hamm:

Yeah, this is like some of my favorite work, especially when I started doing some in depth sessions with different people to just kind of explore, what does it mean, to understand and tap into our own energy, and a lot of really great work came out of that. And what I noticed is that a lot of people don't understand how their own energy sort of moves, it's kind of like, there's a movement to our energy, like, you can you can see this, like some people are, like, they have a sort of a sparkling fun, you know, like light energy. And some people have like a very, like, grounded peaceful, solid energy. So you kind of look at how someone's energy is, and what they're often doing when they come especially when they come into entrepreneurship, and they start getting all this advice about whether it's digital marketing, or how to run their business, or you know, how they have to scale like, everybody's got some opinion, on the right way to do it, or, you know, just do it this way, and you'll be successful. And what I'm finding that holds most people back is a mismatch between their energy and the way that they have decided to approach their business, then this is very, very common, because they've been told this is the way to do it. So they start doing it that way. And it just like doesn't fly, then it could be anything from the way they're engaging their audience, to the number of things they have taken on to the type of energy, it's going to require to maintain that. There's so often a mismatch, and once people come into understanding, like how they're, you know, like best expression of themselves. And I mean, let's like even just look at that, like, so often, we're not even in the full expression of ourselves, because we've had our parents or, you know, some friend group or some other influence on top of us that has sort of squashed something in us, that has held it back and said, you know, oh, well, you don't do that, or you don't express this way. And you can make it really difficult to even know your own real bass energy. And so kind of teasing that out for people and letting them see like, okay, you're really on now. It's really flowing. And this is what I'm seeing on how it works. And so like, you have to kind of match your approach with the energy type.

Christine Li:

Yes, I think that's a very smart baseline to get people to so that they're not running themselves ragged. They're not feeling like they're hitting their heads against the wall with what they're trying to do. I think whenever we've faced resistance, it just makes the work that much harder.

Carrie Hamm:

Yes, yeah. And I think some people don't even know like, why do I have that resistance? And it could be anything from you know, stuff hanging out back in their childhood, to you just don't flow this way. Like, I can't tell you how many people I saw from beginning that were like, Oh, well, I have to be on social media. And I have to do video and therefore like, I have to be bigger, I have to be bigger, I have to be more fun if we weren't through the attic. And I was like, okay, but that's not who you are. That is the antithesis of who you are. You have this like really calm, gentle, you know what I was like, green growing energy. It's so different. If you are showing up kind of trying to be loud and sassy and bold. First off, it's just going to feel like a mismatch. Like we're going to look at that and be like that doesn't feel genuine at all. And secondly, you're just not going to be able to attract the people who actually do and would want to work with you the way you are. And so that's a really common example. But there are so many other things too, like just the fact that sometimes people are kind of starting at the wrong level. When This was one that I struggled with from the gecko was, when I first went into coaching, I was like, Well, I'm going to coach people who are brand new beginners. And that was so much harder for me than coaching people who already had traction were already leaders. And then I had to look back and go, Well, why is this? Well, I've spent my entire career working with and advising leaders. And so like, it does feel very grindy. For me to be all the way back at the beginning, when, when people are trying to work with multiple issues from from the beginning, we don't get as much traction as when I'm working with people who kind of have had some success, they know where they're going. And now we've got to make these tweaks to really get them off and running.

Christine Li:

Yeah, my sense is that what you help people do is you help people to use their natural strengths, and get back to them. And then all of a sudden, the work must feel so much easier for them.

Carrie Hamm:

Absolutely, that is absolutely a great way to describe it. Because often just people in a lot of it, we're working with things that people can't easily see. And I think this is just something about working with your own ego. And this is something you're going to bump up against in entrepreneurship, especially. But also, if you're a leader in a big organization, as we grow, the fears, and the little things that seem smaller before will get bigger, and the ego sort of obfuscates them, it gets in there and says like, you don't need to see this. Don't look over here, go look over there, look at that thing. Look at that problem. When really, it's often some problem that maybe people told us about number of times before, that's the biggest thing holding us back. And we're not able to really get a grasp on and see it because it's really in there trying to protect us.

Christine Li:

Okay, so then you're making me think of things like burnout and running ourselves ragged. And all of a sudden feeling so stressed by not knowing how we've gotten there. Can you tell us how you help people protect their energy? Yeah, I

Carrie Hamm:

mean, a lot of the people that I work with now are self identified empaths, or highly sensitive people. And that's just kind of who gravitates towards me, because they know that I get them. And those people have a special set of things that they really have to work with. They really have to protect their energy, because they are very sensitive to other people. And often, environments. And so they're they're really, almost like sponges, they're sort of taking everything in and they have trouble bringing themselves out. And you know, it's partly because I, you know, I think we talked about this a pass like, this is often an adaptive response from people who had some sort of trauma, or were having to be hyper vigilant when they were young. And so they are sort of extending out in their environment. And I've got all their feelers out trying to figure out what's going on, and what's happening over here. And what does that person thinking. And so they're drawing in way too much information. Often that information isn't something they even need at the moment, instead of using it in a targeted, specific way. They're sort of generally just absorbing everything. And so those people need a fair amount of coaching around how to set up better boundaries. And even though a lot of this is just subconscious mental work, like you set a boundary, so that you don't let everyone in or you set a boundary so that you're not taking in the negativity, but you can still put your feelers out for what's positive here, you know, how can I connect with others at a higher level rather than all around their drama and trauma. And so, understanding that is really important for empaths. Where I see a lot of other people, you know, kind of Conversely, the people kind of like the doers of the world, the ones who are much more in their physical energy is really like checking in with themselves periodically to get an awareness of when they have done too much. And whether or not things are working, they need a lot more time for self reflection, and a kind of like, even look at this on a scale of they're the people who are like up in their heads a lot to are kind of out in the ether. And overall their ideas are running around. And these are the people who are more like the physical energy of I take action, I move forward. I get things done. And I press on. And those people will very often not be paying attention to the fact that their bodies are wearing out that they're so stressed that they can't sleep and they're not connecting the dots between their sort of blind forward motion and getting disconnected from their insides.

Christine Li:

Okay, thank you for describing that. That was a really lovely description of how someone might develop into a highly sensitive person because their background was so stimulating that they needed to be on in that kind of way but in adulthood that that could be detrimental to be taking in so much information and then feeling Like they're spent, because they can't manage all the stimuli, they can't manage all the stress of having to take care of people.

Carrie Hamm:

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, even in my own life, being an entrepreneur who has autoimmune issues, looking at, I spent time with groups of people with autoimmunity, especially people in my community who have food issues, this was one of the most common things like it was an immediate pattern that we could see was that there was this tremendous hyper vigilance. And so like it can have real physical effects on people long term, you know, and we're still looking at correlation there. But that's a really strong correlation that these that so many people who are being hyper vigilant about their relationships, their environment, and what's going on in the world can really take that on in their bodies in a detrimental way.

Christine Li:

I had never heard of that. That's fascinating.

Carrie Hamm:

Yeah, it really is. And there's really a fair amount of science that's starting to come catch up with that to say, we're really seeing that if we can even start to control for this. I can't remember you know, that they're basically trying to use some drugs and therapies to control for the hyper vigilance at the core to help the body stop attacking itself is fascinating.

Christine Li:

Yes, so really protecting ourselves without limiting ourselves is such an important, I would say, daily moment to moment kind of activity that we should all engage in. Would you agree with that?

Carrie Hamm:

Yeah. Oh, absolutely. And just understanding what that balance is like, what do I want to let in? I think people don't often realize we're so much more in control of what we let in and what we put out than we think. And when we think it's random, then we're sort of always kind of in this victim state of whatever's happening to us. But when we realize I can choose not to let that get me activated, I can choose not to allow that really in and really start to work with that it takes a while to work with that idea before it takes hold in the muscle memory of the body and the energy. But it's incredibly benefited work like you can regain so much energy just from that understanding.

Christine Li:

And understanding that we are in control, I agree, I'm just repeating what you're saying about the word that you're using for your new branding of alchemy, and that it's not just realizing that you have control, it's like being able to see all the things you can now do with that new energy and that re enlivened energy.

Carrie Hamm:

Yeah, the alchemy aspect is really fascinating for me, and that's a piece of work that's really started coming in, in the past six to eight months. And having been like, you know, my history, I spent 20 years as a Tibetan Buddhist meditator. And like, I don't know, if anybody like if you don't know, the Tibetan Buddhist path, like it's an intensive meditation path. And I learned so much about how we manage our energy, and they were kind of like the masters of managing energy. But alchemy is such a much more accessible concept to people because, you know, we're kind of working with the concepts of what is receptive? How do we send our energy out? How do we receive it back? elementally? What does it mean, when we have more fire, like if we want to draw more fire in like, that's an idea, but we know what it feels like, we know what it feels like to generate warmth, we know what it feels like to generate that like, you know, alive activity, we know what it feels like to bring our energy down into something that feels solid, you know, like Earth. And so working with these concepts that allows people to sort of get a grasp of the fact that this emotional and energetic aspect of it is very fluid, and that we have much more control over it than we think it's not very random and that we can bring in the elements we want to sort of evolve and bring ourselves to whatever next level that you know, we want to be living.

Christine Li:

And what is your thought about why most of us are reluctant to release that fire or to really maximize that power?

Carrie Hamm:

For a lot of people, you know, childhood stuff, or something that has happened, it is so amazing, and you know, anybody who's done NLP work, neuro linguistic programming, will know, sometimes the smallest thing in your past can be holding you back. And it could be just some off comments someone made, but the way that we internalized it as a child, sometimes as an adult, we will Oh, well that thing is bad. Or if I do that thing, people aren't going to love me. And I mean, we think about like how we are as human beings, like really, most of the time, what we're looking for is we're looking for love, we're looking for acceptance, and we're looking to like generate things we love in the world. So if we, you know, kind of operate from that baseline, anytime something has stymied that or set us back, then we're like, okay, or internal programming says, Well, that's not going to work. So you know, pull that out of the routine and do something else. And so, an important piece of that work is being able to go back and go, Okay. What's this broken piece of that program over here? What is it running well Let's go take that out. So that it's actually utilizing all the resources and not being some kind of memory suck and bring these new elements back in. And that's often what it is. I mean, even just saying, like, how are we being stymied against using our fire, like, one of the things that came through for me was being told that women shouldn't have strong opinions, that was a common thing in the south that my mother thought that was like, you need to just tamp your opinion down, because nobody's gonna like that. It's great that you have them, but you did just shut them up. So that's no code aspect of that, like, in my natural state, that's kind of where my fire is, in the opinion is in the, you know, I have this thing and I think and I want to tell you all about it, you know, and, and feeling like I couldn't do that, that would just drain the energy out of me. And so it was out of balance.

Christine Li:

I love it. I love it, how you slipped in the programming. There's a problem with the programming people. So yeah, I love it. Thank you so much for sharing your fire. I can hear it very clearly today that your fire is in the opinions. They're beautiful opinions. Thank you for sharing your wisdom with us today. Could you please share with us how our listeners can stay in touch with you and have more of you in their lives? If they feel like they need to open up their fire themselves?

Carrie Hamm:

Yeah, absolutely. So I am actually in a little bit of a rebrand right now. So my current company is Hello, we're Emerald City. And all my socials are at Hello, Emerald City. And my website's Hello, Roman city calm and I also run a separate like Instagram and YouTube account and soon to be podcast for the alchemy channel. And you can also find me on clubhouse. I am starting a new club called the alchemy lounge. And I run a little group like every Tuesday evening at 530 Pacific, where you know, I just hang out with other people who were Whoo, friendly and spiritual entrepreneurs. And we just make great connections and chat. And that's, you know, generally how people can find me. I do individual work with people and I have an upcoming mastermind later this year.

Christine Li:

Wonderful. Could you just quickly describe clubhouse to our listeners? I know it's pretty much brand new. Yeah. And what people can expect if they want to find you there. Yeah,

Carrie Hamm:

I absolutely love clubhouse. And you'll hear some people say oh, clubhouse is kind of a time suck. But it is an audio only platform where people can come and chat. It's very similar to almost like a call in radio show when you're on it. You have people on a stage you have people in the audience, you can come up and talk to people on the stage. But what I love about clubhouse is it's a really great equalizer. Like you can have someone who is an amazing coach who's very inaccessible, pop into a room and then you can pop up and ask them questions, just like you were face to face in real life and share your own experiences in a way that you really just don't get to in regular social media. So it really creates these fantastic, like nice, like intimate connections with people. So I think it's going to be a stellar platform for anyone who's really looking to just make stronger, better connections, whether it's with collaborators, or it's with clients. But yeah, it's just so fun. It's still very new. It's evolving very, very fast. And you know, and sometimes it's just great to be on as a listener, they have like these amazing experts and also celebrities just talking about fun stuff in there if you're just doing it for the you know, casual listening, but if you're really looking to expand your audience, I haven't really seen anything better for creating really great connections with an audience so and my handle on clubhouse is at Kerry ham.

Christine Li:

Okay, ha Mmm. And Carrie, I can't wait to support your new podcast and to join in with you on clubhouse. You've just convinced me to come see you there. So thank you. Awesome.

Carrie Hamm:

Thank you so much. I enjoyed this so much.

Christine Li:

Thank you. I enjoyed having you. Thanks, everyone for listening. We'll see you next week. Thank you for listening to this episode of The make time for success podcast. If you enjoyed what you've heard, you can subscribe to make sure you get notified of upcoming episodes. You can also visit our website make time for success podcast.com for past episodes, show notes and all the resources we mentioned on the show. Feel free to connect with me over on Instagram too. You can find me there under the name procrastination coach. Send me a DM and let me know what your thoughts are about the episodes you've been listening to. And let me know any topics that you might like me to talk about on the show. I'd love to hear all about how you're making time for success. Talk to you soon.

Carrie Hamm

Business Strategist and Intuitive Coach

Carrie Hamm is a business strategist and intuitive coach who helps entrepreneurs with a big vision to amplify their energy for massive impact and abundance. She draws on a 20+ year career in back office software development combined with 20+ years as a Tibetan Buddhist meditator to dial in the business processes and expansive mindset needed for giant steps in scaling a business.